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Participants in a buffalo hide tanning class.

Braintan Bison Tanning Class
with Barnes
Cardwell, Montana. April 13 - 22, 2017

Thinning a buffalo hide with a dry-scrape tool.

      Have you ever dreamed of brain tanning a bison hide and having your own beautiful buffalo robe? Imagine snuggling with your lover in luxurious comfort, wrapped in warm woolly buffalo. Display it proudly on the couch or as a bedcover. Or take it with you into the wilderness for an authentic Stone Age bed. In this class you will braintan your own bison hide from start to finish!

      Dry-Scraping: The biggest step in the tanning process is to thin the hide with a sharp dry-scrape tool. Make the hide thin and light so it is easier to brain and soften it. For dry-scrape work, the wet bison hide is strung up in a rack and allowed to dry then slowly shaved thinner and thinner. It requires a razor-sharp tool and great care to avoid popping through and making big holes in the hide. Improper dry-scraping can result in numerous holes that must be sewn up. Common ways this happens are over thinning, and trying to hard, so BE careful now.

      The Process: This is the summary of the process. Say thank you to the bison, say a prayer, and start having fun. Soak the hide for 12 to 24 hours to soften it and wash out the dirt, then let the hide drip excess water for a bit. Poke frame holes in the hide, and string it up in a frame. Let the hide dry in the frame and start fleshing or dry scraping membrane off hide. Then start thinning hide and don't pop too many holes!

Smoking a braintanned bison hide buffalo robe.       Brain it a few times and spend hours softening hide. Smoke hide and BAMMM....brained bison robe! Keep in mind that this is Montana. Spring temperatures could range from 20 to 50F. Scheduling the class over a longer period will hopefully allow students more time to catch decent weather and be productive. This class is weather dependent. Spare time will allow our bodies to recuperate, learn from each other, laugh often, and keep stress levels low.

      Working bison hides is no easy peazy thing. Your body will be sore, tired, and cold at times. There might be forty hours of work on a hide, maybe more or less depending on commitment levels. Staff will help you along your journey, and we will not make you do anything you don't wish. We also will not do a cram session in the last day(s) if you slack off during the class. This class will involve work, frustrations, and play. A natural hot springs is about eight miles away for relaxation and rejuvenation.

      Class includes all hide-tanning materials, and price of the hide depends on where Barnes can get hides. There's ample camping at River Camp in various primitive structures, including an earthlodge and wickiups. Cooking happens over the campfire or on a propane stove. Bring your own food and extra warm sleeping bag or laying options. River Camp is a tobacco, alcohol and drug-free site. This class is exclusively offered to Green University® LLC interns. Please read more about our internship program, and sign up to join the fun! Hope to see you here!


More about Montana Bison

Buffalo stomach, ready for tanning.

      The plains bison (a.k.a. "buffalo") were a one-stop resource for Native Americans, providing nutritious food, warm buffalo robes, stomachs for bags, bones for tools, and much more. Buffalo were nearly exterminated in the 1800s, yet today they are making a slow comeback on private ranches and many public places like Yellowstone National Park, the National Bison Range, and Wind Cave National Park. The burgeoning bison population in Yellowstone National Park has enabled Native American tribes to enact their treaty rights to hunt buffalo, which is now allowed where the animals wander outside of Yellowstone National Park in winter.

      Thomas Elpel and Katie Russell stumbled upon the buffalo hunt in the winter of 2013, collected a few surplus hides, heads, and stomachs, and made initial connections with the native hunters. Each winter since then, Katie returned with friends and camped out in February and March to collect and utilize left-behind pieces from the hunt - hides, skulls, bones, fur, organs, and more. In the process, they worked to build connections with the native hunters, the Buffalo Field Campaign, park officials, tourists and townsfolk alike. It was their goal to build a bridge between cultures, factions, and political lines in common recognition of the innate worth of the buffalo, and our own shared humanity, as described in the video below.



Interested in more classes and events?
See our full schedule!

Books
authored by
Thomas J. Elpel
Roadmap to Reality: Consciousness, Worldviews, andthe Blossoming of Human Spirit
Roadmap
to Reality
Living Homes: Stone Masonry, Log, and Strawbale Construction
Living
Homes
Participating in Nature: Wilderness Survival and Primitive Living Skills.
Participating
in Nature
Foraging the Mountain West: Gourmet Edible Plants, Mushrooms, and Meat.
Foraging the
Mountain West
Botany in a Day: The Patterns Method of Plant Identification
Botany
in a Day
Shanleya's Quest: A Botany Adventure for Kids
Shanleya's
Quest

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